wildwesjames:

backwoodscountryboy97:

Everyone who can please take some time and report this to Florida fish and wildlife commissions (FWC) This guy killed a protected eastern indigo (drymarchon couperi) in the state of Florida. Which can lead to him serving jail time. Conservation can’t work if we got idiots like him killing indigos. The website to report him is http://m.myfwc.com/contact/wildlife-alert/ Or google FWC report.

myakka Florida. Manatee county
 

This, is heartbreaking.  

  My name is Wesley James. I live in Sarasota Florida and have been hiking Myakka State Park for as long as I’ve had legs. 

I have, in 23 years, never ONCE seen a single wild indigo snake. They are not only my most favorite animal in Florida but among some of the most rare animals in the US.

The eastern indigo is critically endangered living almost exclusively in burrows of the also protected and also declining gopher tortoise(Gopherus polyphemus) which has had much of its habitat destroyed due to urban development. They are a harmless but large black colubrid, the largest in the US in fact, and often killed because of their imposing size. Anyone who has spent time with these animals knows however that they are quite docile and not inclined to bite at all. These animals are in extreme decline from all fronts due to a number of causes and unfortunately among them people who intentionally kill them. This, this akin to intentionally killing a rhino or Andean condor in terms of both rarity and ecological significance and it gets worse…

  Judging from the size of this animal it’s likely to be a female. What this man has done is not only killed one single endangered animal but taken a whole possible generation of offspring. Females of snakes are not only important for birthing new generations but often much less common than males. In populations of certain species the ratio can be 10 to 1 and in extreme cases (certain garters) 100+ to 1. Taking a female out of the wild could prove potentially fatal to an entire local population. 

Please, even if you are not fond of snakes, if you love animals understand that what this person has done is terrible, illegal, and damages both this species and the environment that it lives in. I love these animals, I love them with all my heart and the fact that this makes it that much less likely to see one hurts like losing a friend. I have several contacts in the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission and will be reporting this but if you could please share to spread awareness about this species I would be extremely grateful. 

                                            Thank you. -Wes. 

thescienceturnip:

jennrosefx:

Captain Rex saves an adorable little alien from certain doom. #ItsComeToThis #WhatElseWouldIBeDoing #captainrex #becauseclones #clonetrooper #clonewars #spider #jumpingspider #phidippus #phidippusregius #bugluv

omgosh.

thescienceturnip:

jennrosefx:

Captain Rex saves an adorable little alien from certain doom. #ItsComeToThis #WhatElseWouldIBeDoing #captainrex #becauseclones #clonetrooper #clonewars #spider #jumpingspider #phidippus #phidippusregius #bugluv

omgosh.

calleo:

These are my two “aggressive” snakes.

Why aggressive?

I got them both from people who swore up and down they were too aggressive to be handled.

The rat snake, Puff, is from a local pet store and was sold for $10 down from $50 because they couldn’t offload an “aggressive” snake on anyone.

Problem is, he’s not aggressive at all. Young rat snakes, wild or captive bred, are incredibly defensive until they’re larger because they’re prey animals for just about anything. They will, if given a few seconds to psych themselves up, begin hissing and striking whenever anything comes near. You get around this by not GIVING them time to freak themselves out, open tank, grab snake, snake has no time to start worrying, and settles right down once in hand.

What was happening is people would go to pick him up, get scared (ffs, his teeth can’t even break human skin at this size), and start flailing their hands around if he’d strike, which only terrified him and made him continue to hiss and strike, which got him labeled ‘aggressive’.

The second snake is a corn snake, that I renamed Snaps, I got off of Craigslist for $5.

There was a long ad about how the person had bought the snake on Craigslist a few weeks prior and was told it was aggressive but the aggression was understated, that they didn’t know how to deal with such an aggressive snake, and were now afraid of it. They’d worked with him ‘for weeks’ and saw no change. I was expecting to find an adult that maybe just hadn’t been handled much.

What I got was a barely not a hatchling who was behaving, you guessed it, perfectly normally for a hatchling. Hatchlings of most species are defensive and will readily strike, hiss or bite, because they’re frightened and are reacting like the prey animals that they are.

Neither one of these snakes are aggressive.

They will, as they get larger, largely grow out of it and will be easier to handle without having to be quick about getting them picked up out of the tank.

These snakes stay small for several years before they hit adult size. They will be defensive and snappy if allowed the time to get themselves worked up and freaked out before you pick them up. It may take 3-5 YEARS before your baby calms down enough to be calm with your hands poking around in their tank.

Settle the fuck down and stop telling people you have an ‘aggressive’ snake (and for god’s sake, stop rehoming them as ‘aggressive’) when what you have is a young snake behaving normally.

scalestails:

gastropods:

SLUG BUDS

I need these. What are they called?? I’m going to Google furiously.

They’re leopard slugs! They’re common in wooded areas in Europe and the US, and they make pretty good pets.

drhoz:

bogleech:

nevver:

Worm eating worm

Specifically, a fucking beautiful Japanese mountain leech.
I would move to Japan JUST to be able to go hiking and come back with these and keep them in a terrarium and breed them and nurture them.

Actually, the bonus video at the link is the Japanese leech. The main video is from Borneo.

drhoz:

bogleech:

nevver:

Specifically, a fucking beautiful Japanese mountain leech.

I would move to Japan JUST to be able to go hiking and come back with these and keep them in a terrarium and breed them and nurture them.

Actually, the bonus video at the link is the Japanese leech. The main video is from Borneo.

dmitrithegoldfish:

The new golden dojo loaches have settled in nicely! 

gastropods:

SLUG BUDS

macrodan:

A bald-faced hornet (Dolichovespula maculata) chewing up a wooden fence to make paper for its nest.

endangereduglythings:

rhamphotheca:

Paddlefish Release, Sept. 23, 2014, Caddo Lake State Park

With the success of the first release, 2,000 more vulnerable paddlefish were released at the boat ramp at Caddo Lake State Park in East Texas. This is park of a continuing effort by Texas Parks & Wildlife Dept. to reestablish the historically common American Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) in Texas waterways.

(via: Texas Parks & Wildlife Dept.)

Look at the slimy spoonfaced babies!

fimbry:

I’m still visiting my parents so no new photos, and I have no art I can post, so have some baby pics of Sasha. She was like a 7-8” worm and I love looking back to these shots. She was so small.

That last one is one of my luckiest photos ever ahhhhh. i caught it at the perfect moment and it’s MIRRORED!!

(She was only in this container for acclimation and inspection.)

Gymnothorax fimbriatus

drtanner:

blackunic0rn:

Naturally occurring gears as a skeletal mechanic to sync jumping motion in juvenile planthoppers. Naturally occurring gears. This mashed every nerd button I have.

SCIENCE!

libutron:

Northern Leaf-tailed Gecko - Saltuarius cornutus
Endemic to the wet rainforest between Cooktown and Townsville in Queensland, Australia, the Northern Leaf-tailed Gecko, scientifically named Saltuarius cornutus (Carphodactylidae), is a species of large, arboreal gecko, that grows up to 16 cm in length.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Stephen Zozaya | Locality: Paluma Range, Queensland, Australia (2013)

libutron:

Northern Leaf-tailed Gecko - Saltuarius cornutus

Endemic to the wet rainforest between Cooktown and Townsville in Queensland, Australia, the Northern Leaf-tailed Gecko, scientifically named Saltuarius cornutus (Carphodactylidae), is a species of large, arboreal gecko, that grows up to 16 cm in length.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Stephen Zozaya | Locality: Paluma Range, Queensland, Australia (2013)

elendraug:

jumpingjacktrash:

the-real-seebs:

ursulavernon:

Frogs fall out of my mouth when I talk. Toads, too.

It used to be a problem.

There was an incident when I was young and cross and fed up parental expectations. My sister, who is the Good One, has gold fall from…

earthandanimals:

Ruben The Argentine Red Tegu also known as my son.

earthandanimals:

Ruben The Argentine Red Tegu also known as my son.

sir-p-audax:

Baby Ophelia with her teddy bear.