libutron:

Wolf’s Milk Slime  (Toothpaste Slime)
Fruiting bodies (scientifically named aethalia) of the plasmodial slime mold Lycogala epidendrum are quite distinctive by its little, round, reddish pink balls, which exude a pinkish orange paste when popped. This cosmopolitan slime mold grows in groups on dead wood, especially large logs. 
[Mycetozoa - Myxomycetes - Liceales - Tubiferaceae - Lycogala - Lycogala epidendrum (L.) Fr., 1829]
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©MaKeR i | Locality: unknown

libutron:

Wolf’s Milk Slime  (Toothpaste Slime)

Fruiting bodies (scientifically named aethalia) of the plasmodial slime mold Lycogala epidendrum are quite distinctive by its little, round, reddish pink balls, which exude a pinkish orange paste when popped. This cosmopolitan slime mold grows in groups on dead wood, especially large logs. 

[Mycetozoa - Myxomycetes - Liceales - Tubiferaceae - LycogalaLycogala epidendrum (L.) Fr., 1829]

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©MaKeR i | Locality: unknown

rhamphotheca:

Baby Cuvier’s dwarf caiman (Paleosuchus palpebrosus), species from northern and central South America.

rhamphotheca:

Baby Cuvier’s dwarf caiman (Paleosuchus palpebrosus), species from northern and central South America.

astronomy-to-zoology:

The Shark (Cucullia umbractica

…is a species of Noctuid moth that is distributed throughout much of the Palearctic ecozone, occurring in Europe, Russia, Afghanistan, Turkestan, and Mongolia. Sharks are fairly large moths with individuals boasting wingspans of 52-60 mm! Adult sharks will typically fly from June to July and will feed at night on nectar. Shark caterpillars have many recorded food plants, but mainly feed on sow thistles and Lactuca spp. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Noctuidae-Cuculliinae-Cucullia-C. umbratica

Image: ©entomart

ejlandsman:

The cat’s out of the bag! Here’s the giant secret project I’ve been sitting on: several fellow artists from my scientific illustration program and I are doing a Kickstarter campaign to help get a NATURAL SCIENCE THEMED COMIC BOOK off the ground. As the title implies, this book is going to be awesome, so please stop by and pitch in if you can! The perks include commissioned artwork by me and other artists!

notexactlylegal:

Today I found out about “Spotted Pied BP’s” and I have never wanted a snake more. 

Pics are the same animal, currently owned by Matthew Marculis, produced by Marc Bailey (If sources don’t fail me.)
 

If anyone has more details on this thing I’d love to know, because up until today I had never seen such a neat pattern. 

crispysnakes:

YES!!!  Congrats to Illinois!

reptilefacts:

Blood python by Chris McAra of Giantkeeper Reptiles

reptilefacts:

Blood python by Chris McAra of Giantkeeper Reptiles

So... what is headboob, anatomically speaking?

crispysnakes:

It’s the muscles surrounding the jaws.  The shape of the head is determined by the shape of the skull.  

Here’s a boa:

Here’s a boa skull.  Note the structure of the jaws, particularly the back end where sit the the two joints that control the gape of the snake (snakes have five mobile and one immobile joint within their skulls).  See the boxy, rounded shape those two joints make?

Here are the two overlaid:

Now imagine the muscles needed to control those joints.  Depending on the species/size of the snake and the prey they feed on, they’ll need more or less muscle mass to operate their jaws.  

See those big fleshy white things in the corners of the mouth?  That’s all muscle that, when the mouth is closed, occupies the space in the skull that people like to squish.  

That, is headboob.  

europewilds:

screamingcrawfish:

hellish-deer:

ceruleanpineapple:

spiders.

they’re like tiny 8-legged cats
how can anyone hate them

 (via starfoozle)

crispysnakes:

Come on folks, there are only a few days left to comment on this!  Deadline is July 24th!  This Thursday!

All Americans who appreciate their freedom to have pets should comment. This may only affect big snake keepers now, but any species could be the next target. The entire pet community is being picked apart as we are not supporting each other in protecting our freedoms. Support your pet and reptile community and comment today! Over 80 million American households have pets. Over five million of those have pet reptiles. There should be tens or hundreds of thousands of comments made against adding additional species to the Constrictor Rule. This needs to be shared! Below are Talking Points, comment links, mailing address, sample letter, FAQ and more. 
Deadline is July 24 (no extension): Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is taking additional comments regarding listing five species of snakes (Boa constrictor, Reticulated python, DeSchauensee’s anaconda, Green anaconda and Beni anaconda) as injurious under the Lacey Act. These species were originally proposed in 2010. If listed, FWS would ban interstate transportation/commerce and importation. Remember to be professional and civil with your comments.
Comments must be submitted at www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570 and clicking Comment Now! in the upper right. You may also comment at www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570.



WHAT’S THIS ABOUT?  WHAT CAN YOU WRITE?  CLICK HERE AND SCROLL DOWN.



Please guys, if you haven’t yet, go visit the site and comment to defend our ability to keep our animals.  If you missed why this is so important to us (and me) last time, it’s this: once added to the Lacey act, these animals cannot be moved or sold across state lines. 


For me, and in time you (you know they’re coming for BPs and smaller exotics next, just look at the bans coming out of West Virginia and the Carolinas), this means:

1.  If you get a job in another state or have to move to another state, you cannot take your pet(s) with you like a responsible owner.
2.  If your vet is across state lines or you have to seek medical attention for your animal across state lines, you can’t take it there.
3.  You can’t ship in or ship out from your state, destroying any chance at a solid business.
4.  Do you travel from state to state doing educational programs with your animals?  Good luck.  You might be able to get a permit for it.  Maybe.  If they’re feeling generous.
5.  Conservation through captive breeding?  Not anymore. 

And if you get caught trying to take your pet or sell your stock over state lines?
1.  Up to $10,000 in fines
2.  Jail time
3.  Congratulations, you are now a felon.

So again, please help us stop this assault on responsible reptile ownership.

crispysnakes:

Come on folks, there are only a few days left to comment on this!  Deadline is July 24th!  This Thursday!

All Americans who appreciate their freedom to have pets should comment. This may only affect big snake keepers now, but any species could be the next target. The entire pet community is being picked apart as we are not supporting each other in protecting our freedoms. Support your pet and reptile community and comment today! Over 80 million American households have pets. Over five million of those have pet reptiles. There should be tens or hundreds of thousands of comments made against adding additional species to the Constrictor Rule. This needs to be shared! Below are Talking Points, comment links, mailing address, sample letter, FAQ and more. 

Deadline is July 24 (no extension): Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is taking additional comments regarding listing five species of snakes (Boa constrictor, Reticulated python, DeSchauensee’s anaconda, Green anaconda and Beni anaconda) as injurious under the Lacey Act. These species were originally proposed in 2010. If listed, FWS would ban interstate transportation/commerce and importation. Remember to be professional and civil with your comments.

Comments must be submitted at www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570 and clicking Comment Now! in the upper right. You may also comment at www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570.
Please guys, if you haven’t yet, go visit the site and comment to defend our ability to keep our animals.  If you missed why this is so important to us (and me) last time, it’s this: once added to the Lacey act, these animals cannot be moved or sold across state lines. 
For me, and in time you (you know they’re coming for BPs and smaller exotics next, just look at the bans coming out of West Virginia and the Carolinas), this means:
1.  If you get a job in another state or have to move to another state, you cannot take your pet(s) with you like a responsible owner.
2.  If your vet is across state lines or you have to seek medical attention for your animal across state lines, you can’t take it there.
3.  You can’t ship in or ship out from your state, destroying any chance at a solid business.
4.  Do you travel from state to state doing educational programs with your animals?  Good luck.  You might be able to get a permit for it.  Maybe.  If they’re feeling generous.
5.  Conservation through captive breeding?  Not anymore. 
And if you get caught trying to take your pet or sell your stock over state lines?
1.  Up to $10,000 in fines
2.  Jail time
3.  Congratulations, you are now a felon.
So again, please help us stop this assault on responsible reptile ownership.

blujayonthewing:

buggirl:

It’s HERE!!     LAUNCH DAY!!!!    I’m so excited to share my research goals with you!!

Now more than ever, with programs such as citizen scientists and Project Noah, is the general public becoming more crucial to the scientific process. 

If you could share this post ,and spare a donation to my scientific research, even if it is just $1-$5, you can make a huge difference in conservation and the future of science.

Give a dollar to spiders!!!    Thank you, Tumblr, for continued support and a place for me to share my passions with others.

-Andrea

aka buggirl

Guys! Do the thing! Help make cool science happen

ichthyologist:

Thresher Shark (Alopias sp.)

Thresher sharks are large sharks found in all temperate and tropical oceans of the world. They can be easily distinguished by their long caudal fin, which can be as long as the shark’s body. This fin is actively used as a weapon to stun fish. After herding the fish into a tight group, the shark swims quickly at the prey and uses its tail like a whip to stun several fish at once.

Rafn Igni Finnsson on Flickr, gif via PLOS media on Youtube

sleepysnakes:

interstellardragon:

Brazilian Rainbow Boa: Calico

This is the same snake:

first picture was taken in 2007, the second in 2012

W.o.w

libutron:

Northern Spiny Tail Gecko

These hypnotic eyes belong to the Northern Spiny Tail Gecko, Strophurus ciliaris aberrans (Gekkonidae), a large gecko (up to 15cm long), endemic to western Australia. 

As suggested by their common and scientific names, these geckos have two rows of large spines down the upper surface of the tail, and a row of small spines above the eye. In fact, Strophurus means ‘turning-tail’, and ciliaris ‘eyelashed’, in reference to the spines above the eyes.

When molested, this gecko exudes a noxious sticky fluid from the glands in its tail.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Jordan Vos | [Top] - [Bottom]

Locality: Gascoyne, Western Australia